BIBLICAL GREEK MADE SIMPLE
ALL THE BASICS IN ONE SEMESTER

Danny Zacharias

  PURCHASE ON    AMAZON   ,    LEXHAM PRESS   , OR    LOGOS

PURCHASE ON AMAZON, LEXHAM PRESS, OR LOGOS

The First Introductory Greek Grammar to Fully Embrace Bible Software in the Learning Process!

New Testament Greek Stripped Down is a unique introductory Greek grammar which seeks to provide students with an understanding of the essentials of Greek grammar while equipping them to make immediate use of Greek for exegesis using Logos Bible Software.


What makes NT Greek Stripped Down unique:

~Equips Students to Immediately Make Use Of Greek~
Instead of shunning Bible Software as a crutch, this textbook fully embraces the use of Bible software and equips the student to make immediate use of Greek in exegesis through the training and use of Logos Bible software for exegesis in the primary language.

[The] visual approach to the formation of Greek words is splendid and discussions of grammar and syntax focus well on those facets that are most important for interpretation…Seminary professors and motivated individual learners alike will want to give this a close look
— David A. deSilva, Trustees' Distinguished Professor of New Testament and Greek, Ashland Theological Seminary

~Built For The Next Generation~
NT Greek Stripped Down is published by Lexham Press. Available in a beautiful hardcover or in Logos digital format, the textbook is accessible in the way you want it.

~Rich Use of Multimedia~
Numerous videos to help understand grammar and learn Logos Bible software are linked throughout the book, as well as ready-made online flashcards to help users remember the core elements of each chapter. 

As many colleges and seminaries already employ Logos Bible Software in the teaching of Greek, this textbook, which integrates learning to use the Logos software alongside a more traditional teaching approach, will prove invaluable.
— Robert L. Plummer, Professor of New Testament Interpretation, The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary

~Designed To Work In One Or Two Semesters~
Ideal for schools that require only one semester of Greek but also want to equip their students to go further in Greek studies when needed as well. For schools that want the flexibility of offering 1 or 2 semesters of Greek, this book is designed to accommodate.

~Compatible with the Author's Apps and Multimedia Offerings~
Compatibility for NT Greek Stripped Down is built into FlashGreek Pro and ParseGreek apps to enrich the learning experience. In addition, The Singing Grammarian is also drawn upon throughout the text.

~Up to Date and Accurate Scholarship~
This introduction to Greek makes use of and teaches students the latest in Greek scholarship, particularly on components related to Greek verbs.

~Video Lessons Available~
For self-learners or students needing additional teaching time, the author has created video lectures to accompany the textbook. The video course is available on the author's own platform, and is available on any device. In the video course, students have access to video lectures for every chapter, with accompanying PDF slides, AND the ability to ask questions of the author directly within the course! The Logos Tutorial video course referenced in the grammar is also available.


~Listen to an interview about the book on Tool Talk podcast from Exegetical Tools~


Table of Contents

 

Introducing Biblical Greek Made Simple    xxi

Chapter 1: Signs and Sounds of Greek Made Simple    1

    1.1: The Greek Alphabet    1

    1.2: Greek Vowels    3

        1.2.1: Vowel Contraction    3

    1.3: Greek Consonants    4

        1.3.1: The Sigma with a Liquid    4

        1.3.2: The Sigma with the Stops    4

    1.4: Jots and Tittles in Greek    5

        1.4.1: Breathing Marks    5

        1.4.2: Accent Marks    6

        1.4.3: Punctuation Marks    7

        1.4.4: Diaeresis, Crasis, Elision    7

        1.4.5: Greek Syllables    8

    1.5: The Least You Need to Know    8

    1.6: Greek@Logos    9

    1.7: Vocabulary    10

    1.8: The Second Time Around    16

Chapter 2: Greek Nouns Made Simple    17

    2.1: Greek Inflection    17

    2.2: Noun Cases    18

    2.3: Noun Gender    20

    2.4: Noun Number    20

    2.5: Noun Lexical Form    20

    2.6: Noun Declensions    21

    2.7: Noun Case Endings    22

        2.7.1: 1st Declension    22

        2.7.2: 2nd Declension    23

        2.7.3: 3rd Declension    23

    2.8: Noun Parsing    26

    2.9: The Least You Need to Know    27

    2.10: Greek@Logos    27

    2.11: Vocabulary    28

    2.12: The Second Time Around    34

Chapter 3: Case Functions Made Simple    39

    3.1: Introduction    39

    3.2: Nominative    40

        3.2.1: Simple Subject    40

        3.2.2: Predicate Nominative    40

        3.2.3: Apposition    40

    3.3: Genitive    41

        3.3.1: Possessive    41

        3.3.2: Genitive of Relationship    41

        3.3.3: Attributive Genitive    41

        3.3.4: Apposition    42

        3.3.5: Genitive of Comparison    42

        3.3.6: Subjective Genitive    42

        3.3.7: Objective Genitive    42

        3.3.8: Genitive of Time    43

        3.3.9: Genitive as Direct Object    43

        3.3.10: Descriptive    43

    3.4: Dative    43

        3.4.1: Indirect Object    43

        3.4.2: Dative of Interest    43

        3.4.3: Dative of Reference    44

        3.4.4: Apposition    44

        3.4.5: Dative of Sphere    44

        3.4.6: Dative of Time    44

        3.4.7: Dative of Association    44

        3.4.8: Dative of Means (Instrumental)    45

        3.4.9: Dative of Cause    45

    3.5: Accusative    45

        3.5.1: Direct Object    45

        3.5.2: Double Object    45

        3.5.3: Apposition    45

    3.6: Nouns in the DBL Greek Lexicon    46

        3.6.1: A Word on Semantic Domains    46

        3.6.2: An Analysis of a DBLGreek Noun Entry    47

            3.6.2.1: Lexical Form, Stem, Gender, and Part of Speech    47

            3.6.2.2: Links to Hebrew Equivalents, Strong’s, and TDNT    48

            3.6.2.3: Louw & Nida Number    48

            3.6.2.4: Gloss    48

            3.6.2.5: Brief Explanation, Greek Example, and Scripture Example    48

        3.6.3: DBLGreek Noun Example    49

        3.6.4: Reading a Louw & Nida Entry    49

        3.6.5: Determining The Semantic Domain For A Word Instance    50

    3.6: The Least You Need to Know    50

    3.7: Greek@Logos    51

    3.8: Vocabulary    51

    3.9: The Second Time Around    58

Chapter 4: Greek Indicative Verbs Made Simple    63

    4.1: Verb Basics    63

        4.1.1: Types of Verbs    63

        4.1.2: The Efficiency of Greek Verbs    65

        4.1.3: Greek Aspect    66

    4.2: Components of a Greek Verb    67

        4.2.1: Tense    67

            4.2.1.1: Present Tense    67

            4.2.1.2: Imperfect Tense    68

            4.2.1.3: Future Tense    68

            4.2.1.4: Aorist Tense    68

            4.2.1.5: Perfect Tense    69

            4.2.1.6: Pluperfect Tense    69

        4.2.2: Voice    69

        4.2.3: Mood    70

        4.2.4: Person    70

        4.2.5: Number    71

    4.3: How Greek Indicative Verbs are Formed    71

        4.3.1: The Indicative Slot Machine    71

            4.3.1.1: Slot 1: Augment    73

            4.3.1.2: Slot 2: Reduplication    73

            4.3.1.3: Slot 3: Verb Stems    73

            4.3.1.4: Slot 4: Tense Suffixes    74

            4.3.1.5: Slot 5: Connecting Vowel    75

            4.3.1.6: Slot 6: Primary and Secondary Endings    75

    4.4: Strong Verb Example    76

        4.4.1: Verb Translation    77

    4.5: Verb Parsing    80

    4.6: The Last Word    80

    4.7: The Least You Need to Know    80

    4.8: Greek@Logos    81

    4.9: Vocabulary    82

    4.10: The Second Time Around    87

Chapter 5: Principal Parts and Alternative-Pattern Indicative Verbs Made Simple     91

    5.1: Introduction    91

    5.2: Greek Principal Parts    91

    5.3: Different Types of Verbs    97

        5.3.1: Lexical Middle Verbs    97

        5.3.2: Contract Verbs    98

        5.3.3: Compound Verbs    100

        5.3.4: Second Aorist Verbs    102

        5.3.5: μι Verbs    102

            5.3.5.1: εἰμί    104

    5.4: The Least You Need to Know    104

    5.5: Greek@Logos    105

    5.6: Vocabulary    106

    5.7: The Second Time Around    110

Chapter 6: The Article, Adjectives, Pronouns, and Numbers Made Simple    117

    6.1: Twenty-four Ways to Say “The”    117

        6.1.1: How the Article is Formed    117

        6.1.2: What the Article Can Do    118

            6.1.2.1: Make Something Definite    118

            6.1.2.2: Act Like a Pronoun    118

            6.1.2.3: Rope in a Prepositional Phrase    119

    6.2: Adjectives    120

        6.2.1: How Adjectives are Formed    121

            6.2.1.1: Comparatives and Superlatives    121

        6.2.2: What Adjectives Can Do    122

            6.2.2.1: Attribute Value to a Noun    122

            6.2.2.2: Act Like a Noun (act substantivally)    123

            6.2.2.3: Act as a Predicate Nominative    124

    6.3: Pronouns    125

        6.3.1: How Pronouns are Formed    125

        6.3.2: Personal Pronouns    125

            6.3.2.1: 1st and 2nd Person Personal Pronoun    126

            6.3.2.2: 3rd Person Personal Pronoun    127

        6.3.3: Pronouns That Act Like Adjectives    127

            6.3.3.1: Special Functions of the 3rd Person Personal Pronoun    127

            6.3.3.2: Demonstrative Pronouns    128

            6.3.3.3: Correlative and Possessive Pronouns    129

        6.3.4: Pronouns That Introduce a Dependent Clause    129

            6.3.4.1: Relative Pronouns    129

            6.3.4.2: Indefinite Relative Pronouns    130

        6.3.5: Pronouns That Ask a Question    131

            6.3.5.1: Interrogative Pronouns    131

            6.3.5.2: Qualitative and Quantitative Interrogative Pronouns    131

        6.3.6: More Pronouns Acting Like Pronouns    132

            6.3.6.1: Indefinite Pronouns    132

            6.3.6.2: Reflexive, Reciprocal, and Negative Pronouns    132

    6.4: Numbers    132

        6.4.1: Cardinals    133

        6.4.2: Ordinals    134

    6.5: The Least You Need to Know    134

    6.6: Greek@Logos    136

    6.7: Vocabulary    136

    6.8: The Second Time Around    145

 

Chapter 7: Adverbs, Prepositions, Phrases, and Clauses Made Simple    153

    7.1: Adverbs    153

    7.2: Prepositions    153

        7.2.1: Preposition Forms    155

        7.2.2: Preposition Functions    155

    7.3: More Little Words    157

        7.3.1: Conjunctions    157

        7.3.2: Interjections    158

        7.3.3: Particles    158

    7.4: Word Groups    158

        7.4.1: Phrases    160

        7.4.2: Clauses    161

            7.4.2.1: Independent Clauses    161

            7.4.2.2: Dependent, Participle, and Infinitive Clauses    161

            7.4.2.3: Dependent Clause Introducers    162

    7.5: Syntax and Bible Software    163

    7.6: The Least You Need to Know    163

    7.7: Greek@Logos    164

    7.8: Vocabulary    164

    7.9: The Second Time Around    172

Chapter 8: Participles Made Simple    175

    8.1: Participle Description    175

    8.2: How Participles Are Formed    176

    8.3: What a Participle Can Do, pt.1    181

        8.3.1: Participle Acting Like An Adjective    181

        8.3.2: Participle Acting Like a Verb    182

    8.4: The Least You Need to Know    182

    8.5: Greek@Logos    183

    8.6: Vocabulary    184

    8.7: The Second Time Around    191

Chapter 9: Participle Functions Made Simple    195

    9.1: What a Participle Can Do    195

        9.1.1: Periphrastic Participle    195

        9.1.2: Genitive Absolute    196

        9.1.3: Adverbial Participle    196

    9.2: Understanding Participle Function and Translation    199

        9.2.1: The Subject of an Adverbial Participle    201

        9.2.2: The Tense Of A Participle    202

    9.3: The Least You Need to Know    203

    9.4: Greek@Logos    203

    9.5: Vocabulary    204

    9.6: The Second Time Around    213

Chapter 10: Non-Indicative Verbs Made Simple    217

    10.1: Introduction    217

    10.2: Subjunctive Mood    218

        10.2.1: How the Subjunctive is Formed    218

        10.2.2: Understanding Subjunctive Translation and Function    220

            10.2.2.1: Subjunctive in Independent Clauses    222

            10.2.2.2: Subjunctive in Dependent Clauses    222

        10.2.3: Conditional Sentences    223

    10.3: Imperative    225

        10.3.1: How the Imperative is Formed    225

        10.3.2: Understanding Imperative Translation and Function    227

    10.4: Optative    228

    10.5: The Least You Need to Know    229

    10.6: Greek@Logos    230

    10.7: Vocabulary    231

    10.8: The Second Time Around    238

Chapter 11: Infinitives Made Simple    243

    11.1: Infinitive Description    243

    11.2: How Infinitives Are Formed    243

    11.3: What An Infinitive Can Do    245

        11.3.1: Infinitive as Subject (nominative)    245

        11.3.2: Infinitive as Object (accusative)    246

        11.3.3: Appositional Infinitive or Epexegetical Infinitive (accusative)    246

        11.3.4: Infinitive in Indirect Discourse    247

        11.3.5: Complementary Infinitive    247

        11.3.6: Adverbial Infinitive    248

    11.4: Understanding Infinitive Function and Translation    250

        11.4.1: The Sort-of-Subject of an Infinitive    252

        11.4.2: The Tense Of An Infinitive    253

    11.5: The Least You Need to Know    253

    11.6: Greek@Logos    1254

    11.7: Vocabulary    255

    11.8: The Second Time Around    265

Chapter 12: Where Do I Go From Here?    271

    12.1: Going Beyond    271

    Practice Tables    273

Chapter 13: Appendices    285

    A: Vocabulary Lists    285

    B: Principal Parts    298

    C: A Rubric for Preparing Sermons and Bible Studies    301

    D: Using the BDAG Lexicon    303

    E: Glossary    311

    F: 1 John 1:1–4 Syntax Sheet    325